Lamb Samosas Recipe Review

lamb samosas image

Yummy cooked samosa
uncooked lamb samosas image

Uncooked samosas

Hi, Ray here again.

A couple of years ago I made some curried lamb samosas but they were not a big success. In fact, they were pretty bad, as reported in the curried lamb samosas recipe review. The recipe that I was following used filo pastry and I think (or rather, know) that I don’t understand filo pastry. They were pretty bad although they managed to sneak in a rating of 6.5 out of 10.

Last weekend saw me wandering around a farmer’s market and there was a stall packed full of yummy samosas. I’m not sure how farmers can grow samosas, although they do grow lamb.

I bought one of the samosas and the yummy taste inspired me to try making samosas again and I pounced on a lamb samosas recipe as soon as the recipe arrived on the Curry Focus website.

As usual with samosa recipes, the recipe fell into two parts – one where you make the filling and the second where you make and cook the samosas.

Cooking the filling was easy enough.

Now it’s time to make the samosas.

I made the dough, divided it into 12 pretty equal pieces and rolled the dough into balls. Then I rolled out the balls into rounds. Initially, there was no guide in the recipe as to how big to make the rounds but I learnt the hard way. My first attempt made me roll the dough out pretty thin and the rounds were about 18cm (7 inches) across. I made all the rounds and then made the first samosa. It was pretty big. I made another two samosas just to make sure that my first attempt wasn’t just faulty samosa construction. All the samosas were the same in that they were enormous.

This was not working. So I grabbed the other dough rounds and converted them back into dough balls again. Then I rolled out one of the balls so that it was about 12cm (5 inches) across. And then I put filling into the dough and folded it over. Now that was more like it. This looked like a samosa. So I rolled out the dough balls again but this time to the new size of 12cm (5 inches) and soon had a pile of samosas ready for cooking.

It was looking good. I heated up the oil and put the first samosa in by itself, waited for 3 minutes and then turned it over. After 5 minutes I pulled out the cooked samosa and it looked good. It looked really good. It was golden and a bit crisp (but not too much).

I grabbed some tamarind chutney from the fridge and started into the samosa. It was beautiful. It was well cooked and nice and hot. And so, with this success, the main cooking process got underway. I’ve only got a small deep fat fryer and only one samosa would fit into the basket at a time. But I persevered and eventually the plate of cooked samosas was filled and another plate was called into service. My flatmate arrived home whilst I was cooking the samosas and kindly volunteered to test one. I was right, the samosas were a success.

The samosas tasted great and had a spice/heat level of “Medium”. A couple of visitors arrived a little later (all of my friends seem to be able to smell food cooking from miles away) and offered their tasting services. Once again, the samosas were a big hit and they ended up with an average taste score of 9 out of 10. Excellent.

It took me a couple of hours to make the samosas and cook them but the result was just great. No doubt I will pick up speed with my next attempt, which won’t be too far in the future. And I’ll be use a big saucepan to do the deep frying so that I can cook more than one at a time.

Yummy.

lamb samosas image

Yummy cooked samosa
uncooked lamb samosas image

Uncooked samosas
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